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Lincoln, Abraham. Autograph Letter, Signed

A Scarce Letter
Referencing Lincoln’s Being Appointed
Governor of the Oregon Territory

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Product Description

Lincoln, Abraham. Autograph Letter, signed “Your Friend as ever / A. Lincoln.” Springfield:   17 September 1849. To: Hon. W. A. Minshall.   Oblong 4to.; 1p. [Not in Basler]

Lincoln writes in reference to his own appointment to be the territorial governor of the Oregon Territory – which he declined:

In Full: “Dear Sir / Yours of the 13th announcing the receipt of one of my letters is just received. Before this I expect you have received another telling you all but lest it may have miscarried, I will tell you again– I duly received the paper recommending our good friend, Fellows, and forwarded it to the proper (State) Department at Washington, accompanied by a letter of my own, informing the Secretary who and what the signers (of Minshall’s letter) are, and giving both Majr. Fellows and them as good an indorsement as I was able. This I most cheerfully did, and was all I knew how to do. / Your friend, as ever / A. Lincoln”.

Earlier in the year, Lincoln had finished his only term in the U. S. Congress and returned to the law with a vengeance, as he referenced in an earlier letter (of Sept. 6th) to Minshall: “I have been too busy in court to answer (your letter) till now.”  Lincoln had then written that he “would like exceedingly to oblige Mr. Fellows,” who apparently Minshall was pushing, “but the time is past in this case.”

Lincoln had been himself been pushing his Illinois friend Simeon Francis, editor of the Whig newspaper, Sangamo Journal, now the Illinois State Journal.

William A. Minshall was a lawyer at Rushville, IL. and a Whig Representative in the legislature from Schuyler County. Lincoln had once written to Minshall [Dec 7, 1837]: “We have adopted it as part of our policy here, to never speak of Douglass at all. Isn’t that the best mode of treating so small a matter?”

Written on brown paper in clear, bold ink; lt. fold lines; some overall foxing and written in a neat, clear hand.