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Open – By Appointment Only

Abraham Lincoln Book Shop is open; with some restrictions. We are available By Appointment Only; we are not an Open Shop. We cannot accommodate visitors who do not have an appointment.

  1. There will be a limit of only two guests at a time
  2. Bring and wear a mask for the entire visit
  3. You must wash your hands upon entering the book shop.

We are available for phone, mail and internet orders; as well as by appointment curbside service for our local customers. Please call 312-944-3085, or email to make an appointment.

Please check back frequently, as these plans are contingent upon the local situation.

 

Summer Reading List

Reading is a great way to spend your time during the summer. Whatever you choose to do-visiting the beach, touring in the bubble of an RV, being a armchair tourist, or the simple pleasure of doing nothing at all-getting lost in an interesting book is one of the best ways to enjoy the season.

To that end, we have created our Books for Summer Reading list. We’ve selected some of our favorite titles. This list includes atlases, adventures, biography, humor and more; it spans centuries as well.

If Springfield, IL is your destination, take a look at Paul Angle’s Here I Have Lived, Sidney Blumenthal’s A Self-Made Man.

If you like to dip in and dip out-at the beach or with your books-Nathan Raab’s Hunt for History is a perfect choice. A second-generation dealer in historical material, Nathan is a colleague and a friend. This is a glimpse into the world that we at Abraham Lincoln Book Shop inhabit every day. Or try Pamela Toler’s Women Warriors. Women from across the world and throughout history went to war; with fierce and deadly consequences for their enemies. Another great title for a quick reading break is David Rubenstein’s The American Story. Rubenstein shares his conversations with some of our greatest historians; including Ron Chernow, Walter Isaacson, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Bob Woodward, and many more.

If armchair or battlefield touring is your choice, take a look at our atlases. Bradley Gottfried brings us The Maps of Antietam and The Maps of First Bull Run. Both will give you a much clearer sense of the battle as you travel the field today. Dave Powell’s The Maps of Chickamauga brings the battle movements to you in full color.

Keep your young people reading, too. We love President Squid, whether you’re visiting Washington, D.C. or any of the aquariums throughout the nation. She Came to Slay is a fresh take on Harriet Tubman. The format is accessible for ‘tweens and teens as well. With a “you are there” urgency, James Swanson’s The President Has Been Shot tells the story of the assassination of John F. Kennedy as it has never been told before.

We’ll be featuring many of these titles in our mailers in the coming weeks. To always know that latest news from Abraham Lincoln Book Shop, join our email list.  Everyone here at Abraham Lincoln Book Shop wishes you a happy and safe summer!

Abraham Lincoln Signatures – A Primer

Lincoln Signature with Carte

People are always curious about Abraham Lincoln Signatures. Where do they come from? What makes one example a “starter signature” and another a once-in-a-lifetime find?

In our latest video Daniel Weinberg shares examples of some of the most often seen types of Lincoln signatures. He also explains why knowing the differences can enhance your collecting experience.

 

Shipping Update from Abraham Lincoln Book Shop

UPDATE NEW SHIPPING POLICY

Due to high shipping volumes, all three carriers UPS, FedEx, and USPS have suspended service guarantees. For the time being, we are shipping USPS parcels via Media Mail or Priority Mail only. UPS Ground is the only choice we are offering for UPS service. Also, as we incur a pick-up charge for UPS, there is an additional surcharge on all UPS parcels we ship. This surcharge might be as high as $12.00. This is in addition to the packing and shipping costs. We are shipping on Thursday only for the time being.

Curbside service for local customers is by appointment only. If you are local and would like to order, please call the shop and we will schedule something with you.

Remember to look at the Extra Value Books section. We’ve discounted some good reads to get you through this unprecedented time. Also join us for Take a Break–With History, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 1pm (C). You can have a virtual visit with the shop on our Facebook Page.

Dear Colleagues, Customers, Friends, and Visitors of Abraham Lincoln Book Shop, Inc.,

In accordance with recent directives, we have closed for in-shop visitors. Safety is always our first priority.

Books are a great way to escape from the difficulties for a little while. We have a special selection of Extra Value Books right now, too. There are limited copies of some great contemporary titles at reader-friendly prices. Take a look!

You can order here at the web site and we are available to take your orders at 312-944-3085 10am-4pm, Monday through Saturday. Please give us a call if you would like to order something.  We are packing and shipping on Thursday. We can schedule curbside service, for local customers.

Staying in Touch

We want to stay in touch during these unprecedented times.

As a way to do that, we are launching a new program called Take a Break With History. Watch live when Daniel Weinberg or another member of the shop shares an item from the shop and gives you an in-depth look at it. You can have a quick, virtual visit to Abraham Lincoln Book Shop!

The program airs live at 1pm (C) on our Facebook Page. If you can’t take a break at 1pm, watch it at Facebook when you do!  The item will be posted along with the video under the Take a Break with History tab at the top of the home page after the broadcast.

Follow us on Facebook and Instagram for teasers about the next episode of Take a Break–With History! Join our Mailing List for special offers, too.

We wish everyone good health during these arduous times. We hope to see all of you very soon.

Everyone here believes themselves truly fortunate to do the jobs we do. Thank you all for all your support (and your business!) over the years!

Sincerely,

The Staff of Abraham Lincoln Book Shop, Inc.

Quoting Lincoln… or Not…

Abraham Lincoln is one of the world’s most frequent victims of misattributed and inaccurate quotes.

From the popular and folksy  “Whatever you are, be a good one”–probably paraphrased and usually attributed to William Makepeace Thackery–to President George H. W. Bush’s repeat of “Here I am-warts and all,” attributed to Oliver Cromwell; it seems everyone wants to get Lincoln in their side. My personal favorite leads off this post.

Our local politicians can’t get it right. Not even our governor is immune.

You’d think someone from The Land of Lincoln, who lives only a few blocks from Lincoln’s Springfield home and has the resources of The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum as well as a being both a Dartmouth and Harvard graduate would know to check his sources!

Take a listen to what our own Daniel Weinberg and another Lincoln scholar had to say about Governor Rauner’s gaffe during a talk with Dave McKinney of WBEZ:

Getting Wrong With Lincoln

Maybe we should send a copy of our own Treasury of Lincoln Quotations!

Showing Off Our Signatures

Right now, we have a great selection of Abraham Lincoln signatures at the book shop.

If you are looking for a unique and always-appreciated gift for someone on your holiday list, we have some beautiful options–many with strong Lincoln associations–including Legal documents. We even have a check for renovations to the Lincoln home, which, according to the Lincoln Home National Historic Site, included the construction of a new privy!

Whether it is a signature, letter, endorsement, or document we have examples in many price ranges, as well as other Lincoln books, prints, photographs and other ephemera in all price ranges.

Daniel Weinberg, President of Abraham Lincoln Book Shop, takes a moment to share some of our favorites with you in the video below.

Forgeries abound on the internet, but you can be assured our knowledgeable staff will help you find an authentic one that is right for you. Happy Holidays!

Our Partnership with
Shattered Globe Theatre

The Heavens Are Hung in Black

Abraham Lincoln Book Shop, Inc. is happy to announce a partnership with Shattered Globe Theatre. Their current production, The Heavens are Hung In Black, examines Abraham Lincoln’s days between the death of Willie Lincoln and the issuing of the Emancipation Proclamation.

Celebrating its debut in Illinois, The Heavens are Hung In Black was commissioned by Ford’s Theater for the grand re-opening of the theater in 2009. It is James Still’s personal interpretation on the months leading up to Abraham Lincoln’s signing of The Emancipation Proclamation. This theatrical epic explores Lincoln’s humanity, conscience and leadership through the troubled times of 1862 – as dreams of his famous adversaries and unnamed soldiers walk through his waking life. Sprinkled with text pulled from Lincoln’s prolific letters and speeches, this play explores the heart of the man who led America in a war that we’re still fighting today.

Friend of the book shop, and Pritzker Military Library Alum, Ed Tracy, had this to say about the show:

“…searing and profound production that reveals Lincoln’s anguish and intense personal conflict.”

Director, James Contey, and Lawrence Grimm, the actor portraying Lincoln, joined us at the book shop to talk about the play.

 

Daniel Weinberg, president Abraham Lincoln Book Shop, will be giving a talk after the matinee performance on October 8.

Also, we are recommending two books to enhance your experience with the show. Burrus Carnahan’s Act of Justice, shows how Lincoln used the war powers of the presidency to facilitate and seal the fate of emancipation. We are also recommending George Saunders’ Lincoln in the Bardo, this moving and original father-son story features none other than Abraham Lincoln; as well as an unforgettable cast of supporting characters-living and dead, historical and invented. Soon to be a major motion picture, Megan Mullally and Nick Offerman acquired movie rights to the book in the spring of 2017.

Chicago has a long history of storefront theatres, and Shattered Globe Theatre is part of that legacy. Founded in 1991, Shattered Globe is committed to ensemble of artists and ensemble-based storytelling. They have produced more than 60 plays, including nine American and World premieres, and have garnered an impressive 42 Jeff Awards and 102 Jeff Award Nominations, as well as the acclaim of critics and audiences alike. Shattered Globe Theatre brings its audiences dynamic re-imaginings of classic works, as well as premiere productions that celebrate new voices and innovative viewpoints.

James Still is a four-time nominee for the Pulitzer Prize for Drama. Three of his plays have received the Distinguished Play Award from the American Alliance for Theatre & Education. His plays have been developed and workshopped at Robert Redford’s Sundance Institute Lab, the Eugene O’Neill Theater Center, the New Harmony Project, The Lark, New Visions/New Voices at the Kennedy Center, the Bonderman New Play Symposium, the Perry-Mansfield New Works Festival, the Telluride Playwright’s Festival, and the Colorado New Play Summit. In 2015, his The Widow Lincoln, debuted at Ford’s Theatre.

The play runs through October 21st. Two for one tickets are available at Shattered Globe’s website. Use the code “Books” at checkout.

 

Walter Stahr on A House Divided

Stanton: Lincoln's War Secretary

Daniel Weinberg talked with Water Stahr on A House Divided in August. Stahr’s book, Stanton: Lincoln’s War Secretary. 

Walter Stahr, award-winning author of the New York Times bestseller Seward, tells the story of Abraham Lincoln’s indispensable Secretary of War, Edwin Stanton, the man the president entrusted with raising the army that preserved the Union.

Of the crucial men close to President Lincoln, Secretary of War Edwin Stanton (1814–1869) was the most powerful and controversial. Stanton raised, armed, and supervised the army of a million men who won the Civil War. He organized the war effort. He directed military movements from his telegraph office, where Lincoln literally hung out with him. He arrested and imprisoned thousands for “war crimes,” such as resisting the draft or calling for an armistice. Stanton was so controversial that some accused him at that time of complicity in Lincoln’s assassination. He was a stubborn genius who was both reviled and revered in his time.

Stanton was a Democrat before the war and a prominent trial lawyer. He opposed slavery, but only in private. He served briefly as President Buchanan’s Attorney General and then as Lincoln’s aggressive Secretary of War. On the night of April 14, 1865, Stanton rushed to Lincoln’s deathbed and took over the government since Secretary of State William Seward had been critically wounded the same evening. He informed the nation of the President’s death, summoned General Grant to protect the Capitol, and started collecting the evidence from those who had been with the Lincolns at the theater in order to prepare a murder trial.

Now with this worthy complement to the enduring library of biographical accounts of those who helped Lincoln preserve the Union, Stanton honors the indispensable partner of the sixteenth president. Walter Stahr’s essential book is the first major biography of Stanton in fifty years, restoring this underexplored figure to his proper place in American history.
“A welcome and significant addition to the ample literature on the Civil War and Reconstruction.” —Ron Chernow, author of The New York Times bestseller Alexander Hamilton

Order Your Copy at AuthorsVoice.net

Watch the program:

Gwendolyn Brooks Centennial

Gwendolyn Brooks

Chicago is all abuzz about the Centennial of Gwendolyn Brooks’ birthday. One of the most highly regarded, highly influential, and widely read poets of 20th-century American poetry, Brooks was a much-honored poet, even in her lifetime, with the distinction of being the first black author to win the Pulitzer Prize.

Born in Topeka Kansas in 1917, she was six weeks old when her parents moved to Chicago. She would remain here until the end of her life. She sounds like many of today’s Chicagoans when she said “I am an organic Chicagoan. Living there has given me a multiplicity of characters to aspire for. I hope to live there the rest of my days. That’s my headquarters.”

Her parents encouraged her writing skills and by the young age of 13 she had published her first poem, Eventide, in a popular children’s magazine, American Childhood. By the time she was 17, the Chicago Defender would be publishing her work regularly.

George E. Kent, critic, and Professor of English at the University of Chicago, said it best when he commented that Brooks occupied “a unique position in American letters. Not only has she combined a strong commitment to racial identity and equality with a mastery of poetic techniques, but she has also managed to bridge the gap between the academic poets of her generation in the 1940s and the young black militant writers of the 1960s.”

Brooks once described her style as “folksy narrative,” but she varied her forms, using free verse, sonnets, and other models. Brooks first collection of poetry,  A Street in Bronzeville captures the  spirit and the essence of the Bronzeville neighborhood perfectly. A destination for many African-American people during the Great Migration, the neighborhood today includes the Black-Metropolis-Bronzeville District. The heart of the Chicago blues and jazz scene in the early 20th Century, this area includes many buildings included on the National Register of Historic Places, and nine buildings that appear on the Chicago Landmarks list, including the Chicago Defender Building. It is a neighborhood rich with African-American history and culture.

In 1950, Brooks received the Pulitzer Prize for poetry for her book Annie Allen. The poem traces the changes a young woman experiences as she moves from youthful dreams to the reality of married life. We see Annie Allen grow from childhood to womanhood in an atmosphere conditioned by poverty, racial discrimination, parental expectations, and unhappiness.

In 1953, her only novel, Maud Martha was published. It has been called a “fragmented, poetic narrative;” it again traces the life of a woman as she navigates the passage from childhood to adulthood in black Chicago neighbourhoods.

Just as her first poems reflected the mood of their era, her later works mirrored their time and the horror that racism, sexism and  indifference brought to the community. The title poem of her book,  In The Mecca is a heart-wrenching work that details a woman’s search for her lost child through Chicago’s Mecca Flats. The Mecca Flats was originally a posh hotel for visitors to the World Columbian Exposition, but by 1940 it had become a crowded and dangerous place; that many still called home. A victim of urban renewal, the building was demolished in 1952 to make way for the expansion of IIT.

In 1967, Brooks was commissioned to write a poem for the dedication of Chicago’s Picasso Sculpture, another Chicago institution that is enjoying an anniversary this year.

Brooks continued to work for the rest of her life. Her work matured in the direction of a stronger political stance. Brooks’ poems featured political subjects and figures, such as South African activist Winnie Mandela, the onetime wife of anti-apartheid leader—and later president of the country—Nelson Mandela.

Not just a poet, Brooks was an educator who took her mission seriously. She taught at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, City College of New York, Columbia College of Chicago, Northeastern Illinois University, and Elmhurst College. She was awarded over 75 honorary doctorates during her lifetime and won numerous literary awards.

At the time of her death in late 2000,  Ms. Brooks was the Distinguished Professor of English at Chicago State University and the Poet Laureate of Illinois, a position she had held since 1968.

There are many Gwendolyn Brooks Centennial events planned throughout the city this year. The Poetry Foundation has a comprehensive exhibit that includes Brooks’ scrapbooks, personal writings (she was a chronicler of her own life) as well and much correspondence from other African-American poets and publishing houses. Additionally, The Poetry Foundation has commissioned a play on Brooks’ life. Titled No Blue Memories: The Life of Gwendolyn Brooks, it debuts at The Harold Washington Library Center in November. Produced by Manual Cinema-a creative endeavor that is part design studio, part theatre company-the performance combines intricate paper puppetry, live actors working in shadow, and an original score. Other Chicago venues celebrating Brooks include include the Art Institute, The Newberry Library and Harold Washington Chicago Public Library.  You can learn more at Our Miss Brooks 100.

We Are ShiningOur Author’s Voice network contributed to the celebration. LadyBird & Friends featured a just released version of Brooks’ poem, We Are Shining. This powerful picture book is a celebration of the diversity of our world. Illustrated by Jan Spivey Gilchrist (our guest on the program, below), this life-affirming poem reminds all of us that “Life is for us, and it is shining. We have a right to sing.”  We have a very few signed, first edition copies of this fine book available. Order at AuthorsVoice.net.

Watch the program below:

 

Iannelli Bust to Be Reproduced, Displayed in Paris!

Alphonso Iannelli Abraham Lincoln Bust

One of the most rewarding parts of our jobs here are Abraham Lincoln Book Shop is the opportunity to find the right homes for the objects that come through the shop. What’s even more rewarding is learning what happens to these objects after they leave our hands.

Today’s Chicago Tribune brings us news that one of our favorite and most rewarding placements will bring joy to even more people!

While de-camping from our Chicago Ave. shop a two winters ago, we had the opportunity to place a Lincoln bust created my modernist Alphonso Iannelli. Iannelli was a student of Gutzon Borglum and has strong Chicago roots.

From 1912 to 1915, Iannelli designed posters for the vaudeville acts appearing at the Orpheum Theatre in Los Angeles. There he met Frank Lloyd Wright. In 1914, Wright convinced him to come to Chicago to work on the Midway Gardens. Iannelli is the man behind the still-popular Sprites. He designed many of the structures at the Century of Progress Chicago World’s Fair, too.

Later he opened studio with his wife, Margaret in Park Ridge IL. Together, they expanded into commercial design, advertising, product design and architectural interiors. Local venues, including his studio, and two theaters designed by him still stand today. Visitors to Chicago can see his work at the Adler Planetarium; as well as the carving at One Prudential Plaza, on Randolph St.

Alfonso and Margaret were the subject of a well-attended, months-long Messengers of Modernism exhibit at the Chicago Cultural Center in 2013. Our own M. Sylvia Castle, a fan of modernism and Chicago’s role in bringing it to the world,  attended the exhibit. Iannelli’s Park Ridge studio was acquired by the Kalo Foundation in 2001. It is now part of The Kalo Arts and Crafts Community House, a well-respected center for silversmithing and other disciplines of The Arts & Crafts movement.

Visiting the exhibit sparked her interest in The Kalo Foundation in Park Ridge, IL. Imagine her surprise when when she saw this membership brochure.

Alphonso Iannelli Abraham Lincoln Bust

She had been walking past the bust used on the brochure every, single day for years! Daniel Weinberg, the shop’s owner had acquired it from a long-shuttered gallery in Chicago’s Lincoln Square neighborhood.

Sylvia’s regular habit of attending First Fridays,  a monthly mass gallery opening the shop’s old neighborhood acquainted her with David Jameson, a dealer in modernist and architectural drawings. Jameson was also an expert in the works of Iannelli. He is the author of Alfonso Iannelli: Modern By Design. It was with David’s help that we confirmed that the Lincoln bust that had for years, welcomed visitors to the book shop, was indeed a modernist treasure.

As we started to pack and ready things for moving out of the old shop it became obvious that the best thing we could do is place as many things as we possibly could. The stress on these objects-the packing, the storing expense and environment, the unpacking-can damage them. We had spoken to the Kalo Foundation previously about the Lincoln bust; but they are a small operation with a limited budget. The move gave us all an opportunity to finally send Mr. Lincoln home to Kalo.

That brings us to today’s news. Thanks to Judy Barclay and the Paris-Chicago Sister City Committee the Iannelli bust is being replicated. The replica travelling to Paris! We are thrilled to play a small role in this success!

In his interpretation of Lincoln, Iannelli has a much different opinion of Lincoln than many of his predecessors and peers. Of the Lincoln art of the day, Iannelli said “I wish they appreciated the depth and the bigness, the loftiness of the character of Lincoln. If they did, how could they put up a building like this to commemorate him?” He was no fan of the Greco-Roman ideal that so dominated public monuments of the day.

Iannelli’s sculpture captures Lincoln as a human and not the godlike image so popular of that era. In a time dominated by formal, Romanesque renderings of Lincoln, this has an evocative, hand-wrought quality seldom seen in the early 20th Century. It is Lincoln at his informal, yet deeply serious and ponderous best. It is the very early modernist, Iannelli, deeply considering and responding to the very modern (for his era) Abraham Lincoln.

Modernism’s objective was to be a great equalizer—to bring beauty and design to the masses. The goal of Emancipation was equality—bringing freedom to the masses. Dying almost a century apart, the two men shared a mission.

Bon Voyage, Monsieur Iannelli!

Learn More About The Kalo Foundation

Learn More about the Paris replica in the Chicago Tribune.