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The Latest Book List & Catalog

Our stock of antiquarian books is larger than we can feature on the website. During usual times, we would have customers visiting the shop and these books would be finding new homes in collections everywhere. However these are not usual times.

We endeavor to offer a new Book List every month. If you see something you want or have any questions give us a call or get in touch via email. We are here to sell books or answer any questions.

Join our email list. You’ll be the first to know when our monthly Book List is posted here at the web site. Also, follow us on Facebook.

Booklists

July 2021 – Featuring Gettysburg Books & More

June 2021 – Featuring Classic Lincoln Books & More

May 2021 – Featuring the Commanding Generals & More

April 2021 – Featuring Lincoln Assassination Titles

March 2021 – Featuring Women’s History Month Titles & Much More

February 2021 – Featuring Black History Month Titles & Much More

The Latest Catalog

Download Catalog 184

Download Catalog 183

Abraham Lincoln Book Shop Virtual Visit

You can have a Personal Shopping Experience via Zoom with Abraham Lincoln Book Shop, Inc.

A curated, exclusive, personal shopping experience with our knowledgeable staff provides a safe and convenient opportunity to get meaningful gifts for the history lover on your list; or something exciting for yourselg.

It’s easy to make your appointment. Just complete the form below. After we receive your form, we’ll be in touch and schedule your visit.

We look forward to helping you with your gift-giving needs-even if the recipient is you!

Personal Shopping Form

  • Personal Shopping Appointments are available M-F 10am - 3pm, Sat 11am - 3pm (CST)

Lincoln’s Fly

This morning the media is all “abuzz” about a certain interloper to last night’s vice presidential debate.

Although much less common than cats on a playing field, the fly is no stranger to photobombing politicians. Even Abraham Lincoln was not exempt. Take a close look at Lincoln’s pant leg to see another fly who earned his own place in presidential history!

Let’s hope that Jeff Goldblum doesn’t show in costume at at the next debate!

If your interested in having your own copy of this photograph, we have several versions available. Take a look. 

 

Abraham Lincoln Signatures – A Primer

Abraham Lincoln carte O-58 variant

People are always curious about Abraham Lincoln Signatures. Where do they come from? What makes one example a “starter signature” and another a once-in-a-lifetime find?

In our latest video Daniel Weinberg shares examples of some of the most often seen types of Lincoln signatures. He also explains why knowing the differences can enhance your collecting experience.

 

Quoting Lincoln… or Not…

Abraham Lincoln is one of the world’s most frequent victims of misattributed and inaccurate quotes.

From the popular and folksy  “Whatever you are, be a good one”–probably paraphrased and usually attributed to William Makepeace Thackery–to President George H. W. Bush’s repeat of “Here I am-warts and all,” attributed to Oliver Cromwell; it seems everyone wants to get Lincoln in their side. My personal favorite leads off this post.

Our local politicians can’t get it right. Not even our governor is immune.

You’d think someone from The Land of Lincoln, who lives only a few blocks from Lincoln’s Springfield home and has the resources of The Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum as well as a being both a Dartmouth and Harvard graduate would know to check his sources!

Take a listen to what our own Daniel Weinberg and another Lincoln scholar had to say about Governor Rauner’s gaffe during a talk with Dave McKinney of WBEZ:

Getting Wrong With Lincoln

Maybe we should send a copy of our own Treasury of Lincoln Quotations!

Iannelli Bust to Be Reproduced, Displayed in Paris!

Alphonso Iannelli Abraham Lincoln Bust

One of the most rewarding parts of our jobs here are Abraham Lincoln Book Shop is the opportunity to find the right homes for the objects that come through the shop. What’s even more rewarding is learning what happens to these objects after they leave our hands.

Today’s Chicago Tribune brings us news that one of our favorite and most rewarding placements will bring joy to even more people!

While de-camping from our Chicago Ave. shop a two winters ago, we had the opportunity to place a Lincoln bust created my modernist Alphonso Iannelli. Iannelli was a student of Gutzon Borglum and has strong Chicago roots.

From 1912 to 1915, Iannelli designed posters for the vaudeville acts appearing at the Orpheum Theatre in Los Angeles. There he met Frank Lloyd Wright. In 1914, Wright convinced him to come to Chicago to work on the Midway Gardens. Iannelli is the man behind the still-popular Sprites. He designed many of the structures at the Century of Progress Chicago World’s Fair, too.

Later he opened studio with his wife, Margaret in Park Ridge IL. Together, they expanded into commercial design, advertising, product design and architectural interiors. Local venues, including his studio, and two theaters designed by him still stand today. Visitors to Chicago can see his work at the Adler Planetarium; as well as the carving at One Prudential Plaza, on Randolph St.

Alfonso and Margaret were the subject of a well-attended, months-long Messengers of Modernism exhibit at the Chicago Cultural Center in 2013. Our own M. Sylvia Castle, a fan of modernism and Chicago’s role in bringing it to the world,  attended the exhibit. Iannelli’s Park Ridge studio was acquired by the Kalo Foundation in 2001. It is now part of The Kalo Arts and Crafts Community House, a well-respected center for silversmithing and other disciplines of The Arts & Crafts movement.

Visiting the exhibit sparked her interest in The Kalo Foundation in Park Ridge, IL. Imagine her surprise when when she saw this membership brochure.

Alphonso Iannelli Abraham Lincoln Bust

She had been walking past the bust used on the brochure every, single day for years! Daniel Weinberg, the shop’s owner had acquired it from a long-shuttered gallery in Chicago’s Lincoln Square neighborhood.

Sylvia’s regular habit of attending First Fridays,  a monthly mass gallery opening the shop’s old neighborhood acquainted her with David Jameson, a dealer in modernist and architectural drawings. Jameson was also an expert in the works of Iannelli. He is the author of Alfonso Iannelli: Modern By Design. It was with David’s help that we confirmed that the Lincoln bust that had for years, welcomed visitors to the book shop, was indeed a modernist treasure.

As we started to pack and ready things for moving out of the old shop it became obvious that the best thing we could do is place as many things as we possibly could. The stress on these objects-the packing, the storing expense and environment, the unpacking-can damage them. We had spoken to the Kalo Foundation previously about the Lincoln bust; but they are a small operation with a limited budget. The move gave us all an opportunity to finally send Mr. Lincoln home to Kalo.

That brings us to today’s news. Thanks to Judy Barclay and the Paris-Chicago Sister City Committee the Iannelli bust is being replicated. The replica travelling to Paris! We are thrilled to play a small role in this success!

In his interpretation of Lincoln, Iannelli has a much different opinion of Lincoln than many of his predecessors and peers. Of the Lincoln art of the day, Iannelli said “I wish they appreciated the depth and the bigness, the loftiness of the character of Lincoln. If they did, how could they put up a building like this to commemorate him?” He was no fan of the Greco-Roman ideal that so dominated public monuments of the day.

Iannelli’s sculpture captures Lincoln as a human and not the godlike image so popular of that era. In a time dominated by formal, Romanesque renderings of Lincoln, this has an evocative, hand-wrought quality seldom seen in the early 20th Century. It is Lincoln at his informal, yet deeply serious and ponderous best. It is the very early modernist, Iannelli, deeply considering and responding to the very modern (for his era) Abraham Lincoln.

Modernism’s objective was to be a great equalizer—to bring beauty and design to the masses. The goal of Emancipation was equality—bringing freedom to the masses. Dying almost a century apart, the two men shared a mission.

Bon Voyage, Monsieur Iannelli!

Learn More About The Kalo Foundation

Learn More about the Paris replica in the Chicago Tribune.

A Closer Look at Presidential Libraries on A House Divided

Daniel Weinberg talked with Jodi Kanter about her book, Presidential Libraries as Performance. Brian Dirck was scheduled to talk about Lincoln in Indiana, but was unable to attend.

Kanter’s Presidential Libraries as Performance considers the moments in the presidents’ lives the museums choose to interpret, and not to interpret, and how the libraries approach common subjects in the presidential museum narrative—the presidents’ early years in relation to cultural ideals, the libraries’ representations of presidential failures, personal and political, and the question of presidential legacy.  Kanter demonstrates how the presidential libraries generate normative narratives about individual presidents, historical events, and what it means to be an American. 

Dirck’s Lincoln in Indiana tells the story of Lincoln’s life in Indiana, from his family’s arrival to their departure. Dirck explains the Lincoln family’s ancestry and how they and their relatives came to settle near Pigeon Creek. He shows how frontier families like the Lincolns created complex farms out of wooded areas, fashioned rough livelihoods, and developed tight-knit communities in the unforgiving Indiana wilderness.  With evocative prose, he describes the youthful Lincoln’s relationship with members of his immediate and extended family. A triumph of research, Dirck cuts through the myths about Lincoln’s early life, and along the way he explores the social, cultural, and economic issues of early nineteenth-century Indiana. The result is a realistic portrait of the youthful Lincoln set against the backdrop of American frontier culture. It is part of the Concise Lincoln Library.

Both titles are published by Southern Illinois University Press. Both are available in 1st edition, signed. Order Now. 

 

The Ultimate Guide to the Gettysburg Address

February 9, our own Bjorn Skaptason talked to the authors of The Ultimate Guide to the Gettysburg Address. David Hirsch and Dan Van Haften returned to our program with their always fascinating take on Lincoln’s use of Euclid. Their previous work, Abraham Lincoln and the Structure of Reason was the first book in what has become a fascinating and recuring theme.

Abraham Lincoln’s November 19, 1863, Gettysburg Address is generally recognized as one of the greatest leadership speeches ever written. The Ultimate Guide to the Gettysburg Address explains the 272-word speech more thoroughly than any book previously published. With the aid of colorized step-by-step diagrams, the authors deconstruct the speech into its basic elements and demonstrate how the scientific method is basic to the structure of the Gettysburg Address.

Lincoln’s fascination with geometry is well documented. Authors David Hirsch and Dan Van Haften, however, are the first to discover and then demonstrate Lincoln’s use of the six elements of a proposition and then diagram and explain how his in-depth study of geometry helped him compose the Gettysburg Address. The result is a deeper and richer understanding of the Gettysburg Address that was not previously possible. This concise color examination of one of our nation’s most treasured and important speeches is perfect for all ages and especially for those interested in history, the use of language, and logic.

Copies of Both The Ultimate Guide to the Gettysburg Address and Structure of Reason are Available.

Watch the program: